reviews

located at fargo’s epicenter!

Vinyl Taco is lighting up downtown in a vintage gathering space and creating the most fun anywhere.”Explore the Space!”


Jack MacArthur“This area NEEDS more places like Vinyl Taco. Not only is the food absolutely amazing (fish tacos are my favorite) but the staff was very pleasant and I observed they had a great rapport with their customers. If you’re downtown, do yourself a favor and stop in Vinyl Taco.” ~ Jack MacArthur


amy“AMAZING FOOD! great margaritas. fun and friendly staff. laid back, vintage & modern atmosphere.” ~ Amy McConnell


deanne“Awesome place- great food, awesome service and the moonshine is sure tasty!!” ~ Deanne ‘Collins’ Dooley


kayla“Went there on Saturday night. Amazing! They were very busy and still kept us happy with great food and drinks! :-)” ~ Kayla Krabseth


bekah“Great food, awesome Margaritas, good atmosphere. The waitresses are on top of it which makes this place even better!” ~ Bekah Szurek


matt“Authentic Mexican tacos and appetizers combined with great service and great tunes. It doesn’t get any better.” ~ Matt Burton


High Plains Reader’s Best of the Best 2014

Best Taco

May 1st, 2014

2014 HPR Best of the Best - Best TacoEven though Vinyl Taco is fairly new to Fargo, its popularity and rave reviews are growing exponentially. The recently extended menu offers more “best taco” options for guests, along with a stellar drink menu. Great food and a great atmosphere (all the music is actual vinyl played in the back) makes Vinyl Taco a hot spot for a well-priced and enjoyable meal.

www.hpr1.com 


More Than a Shot: Vinyl Taco’s Tequila Selections Meant for Sipping

By: John Lamb, The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead

February 3rd, 2014

Forum2 02-04-14

Bourbon and whiskey continue to ride out their resurgent popularity, but the future buzz booze may be a little lighter and brighter. Tequila is outgrowing its reputation as fuel for a frat boy’s hangover and getting some notice for its complex flavors. “I think it’s going to be the next new trend,” says Brent McKenzie, manager at Vinyl Taco in downtown Fargo. “I shouldn’t say it’s the next big thing, because it’s already happening.”

Since opening in the fall, Vinyl Taco has been helping reshape the appreciation of tequila from a spring break shot to something sipped and thoughtfully considered. “Tequila shouldn’t be looked down on because of what Jose Cuervo did to the market. It should be appreciated,” McKenzie said. “If you sip it, it’s a fantastic liquor.” When customers order a tequila, Vinyl Taco staffers don’t serve it with salt and limes, what McKenzie refers to as “training wheels,” unless requested. “If they follow the recommendation, they’ll be pleasantly surprised and not overpowered,” he says. “Let’s get back to its heritage. The salt and lime, that’s Americanized. Traditionally in Mexico, it’s meant to be sipped neat,” says Cassie Kouba, who works at Republic National Distributing Company, Fargo, doing training and promotions on different liquors. “You can sip tequila like you can sip a scotch. There are days to enjoy a good tequila on the rocks,” she adds. Kouba and McKenzie both agree that the first thing you should know about tequila is just what kind of tequila you’re drinking. McKenzie says a big obstacle with the drink is that people associate it bad hangovers, but don’t take into consideration the quantity they were drinking – usually shots – and the quality of what they were drinking.

All tequilas are made from the agave plant, but the finer tequilas are made with 100 percent agave, something to look for on the label. A bulk of tequilas are what are unfavorably known as “mixtos,” a mix of agave with added sugar and even caramel or coloring added to give it the gold color. Other items to look for on the label are the age distinctions. “Blanco” means un-aged, “reposado” varieties have been aged for a year in oak barrels, while “anejo” has been aged for more than a year in the barrels and tend to be more expensive. Not a lot has changed in the harvesting or manufacturing of tequila, which keeps the prices down. “You don’t need to spend a fortune to get good tequila,” McKenzie says. “So many people ask for Patron because they recognize the name, but any day of the week I will recommend Milagro at a fraction of the price.”

Forum1 02-04-14A neat Patron Silver is $9. The Milagro silver is $6.50. “The price is the name, not the quality,” says Kouba. Vinyl Taco does serve Jose Cuervo, but the bartender suggests El Jimador and Lunazul (both $4.50) for the same price. Even among types there can be a big range in prices and flavors. At $7 the Milagros Reposado has a nice richness and bold complexity. For $4.75 the El Jimador Reposado doesn’t have that familiar tequila fragrance and is a far mellower drink. The priciest tequila is Milagro Select Barrel for $10, but you don’t have to go top shelf to make a mixed drink. Margaritas are the most popular tequila vehicles at Vinyl Taco, and the Cadillac Margarita – Milagro silver, Cointreau, simple syrup, fresh lime juice, salted rim and a lime wedge for $10 – is the biggest mover. Another bar classic, a Tequila Sunrise, gets made over as a Vinyl Sunrise, with Lunazul Reposado, pineapple juice, hibiscus tea and rosemary sprig for $7. “It’s a spinoff of an old classic, but we’re doing it in a different way and it tastes great,” McKenzie says. The mix, particularly the juice and hibiscus give it a fresh lightness, perfect for when the bar can open its doors in the summer. People have warmed up to tequila twists he’s put on classic cocktails, like the Mexi Mule, a variety of the Moscow Mule, mixing Milagro Reposado, fresh lime juice, simple syrup, ginger beer and a lime wedge for $10. “What I like about tequila is that it’s not vodka. It’s not neutral like vodka, but you can use tequila instead of vodka in a lot of drinks and it tastes just as good … I don’t drink a bloody Mary unless it has tequila,” Kouba says, referring to a drink called, Bloody Maria. She adds that tequila in a cosmopolitan adds a little zest to the drink. As far as food pairings go, no surprise, McKenzie says tequila and fresh citrus juices complement spicy foods. But even neat, tequila holds its own. “I try to encourage (guests) to think of it in the same context as a whiskey,” he says. “Would you sip a whiskey with a steak? Absolutely. So why wouldn’t you with a tequila?”

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Take Vinyl Taco for a spin if you enjoy music and Mexican food.

By: Dave Olson, The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead

October 3rd, 2013

Forum 10-03-14If you’re into music and tacos, you’ll find platters of both at Vinyl Taco.

The new downtown Fargo eatery is tentatively set to open sometime between Oct. 16 and Oct. 21. It will offer a full-service bar and restaurant, and the food and drinks will have a distinctly south-of-the-border flavor.
The “vinyl” in Vinyl Taco refers to the bar’s analog music collection that bartenders will play on turntables kept behind the bar. Owner Warren Ackley said employees will play requests, but for the most part they will spin entire albums at a time, not singles. The setup is in keeping with Vinyl Taco’s mission statement – “Tuned in music, turned on tacos” – said Ackley, who developed the restaurant with business partners Randy Thorson and Lance Thorson.

Vinyl Taco will have two sides: One is the bar and restaurant, which seats about 80 and is aimed at the 21-and-older crowd; the other is a standing area where people, including those younger than 21, can order tacos and Mexican soft drinks to go.

From the standing area, customers can look through a window and view the gleaming stainless steel of the kitchen, where fresh corn tortillas will be made in-house. Ackley described Vinyl Taco’s cuisine as more street food than restaurant fare. The building itself was modified to invite the outdoors inside. The front windows are actually large doors that can be raised to reveal large screen doors.

While showing how the doors worked, Ackley said they expect the screen doors will be used for up to six months out of the year. He also showed off the restaurant floor, which is comprised of 200-year-old floorboards taken from a barn in Gettysburg, Pa.The brick walls and tile ceiling are original to the 1910 structure, according to Ackley, who said the business has pretty much everything it needs to start up except for one critical ingredient – workers. He said Vinyl Taco is still looking to hire bartenders, cooks and servers. Anyone interested is encouraged to show up at the restaurant, or apply via the Vinyl Taco Facebook page.

www.inforum.com